Culture & Leisure

From Urban Jungle to Toyau

They farm what they eat, make what they use and love what they have.In Sheung Shui Wa Shan Tsuen,several young people have set up Toyau, a place where they can getaway from the hustle and bustle of city life, to explore nature. This is where they live and work and learn to get along with one another and with Mother Earth.The inhabitants of Toyau farm, do carpentry, pottery and they draw."If we have guests, we will get up at 6 a.m. to start the day, for example,by cooking," said Sum Wing-kiu, 26,

Breastfeeding Still at Infancy Stage?

  • 2017-03-20
  • 2017-03-20

The demand for more breastfeeding friendly places.

Photo Essay

"The Egg Tart: Evolution of a Classic Hairstyle

TYR's Kenji Chan walks us around a historical barber shop and a celebrity-serving modern salon which offers the same time-honoured hairstyle "Eat Tart", which crazed the city in the 1950s."The pompadour haircut has al-ways been a classical and good men 's haircut," said Adam Chan Moon-tong, a young yet experienced hairstylist.Style such as comparing the look with vintage stone washed jeans and Wonton noodles, Chan said thatHong Kong people had forgotten the grooming culture Shanghai barbers brou

People

Getting Away from Petty People

  • 2017-03-16

Did 2016 go well for you? If not, consider hiring a ‘petty person beater' to beat away the bad luck.

People

Local entrepreneur make taking nice profile-picture a business

  • 2016-12-15

Mandy Cheng presents new possibilities to a traditional market by Emily Xu The bustling Mong Kok district is a shopping paradise. Argyle Centre is one of the most popular shopping centres there. Among the array of shops lies a unique photo studio. Fresh Studio, famous for shooting good-looking profile pictures for your passport photos and icons, was opened recently by 28-year-old Ms Mandy Cheng Ming-wai. "Like many people, I find my passport photos ugly, which inspired me to open this shop," said Ms Cheng. Her studio provides all-in-one services including makeup, clothing, photography and editing. As an entrepreneur, she described herself as ambitious, cautious and organised. "I have been brainstorming to start my business for a long time and considered it as a necessity of my life," she said. Although she had the plan for a long time, she waited for a suitable time to open the shop. She spent hours preparing. "I think working for yourself can give you a great sense of achievement and it is everlasting. Moreover, I want a more challenging life," she said. However, the expensive rent in Hong Kong and the lack of sufficient deposit stopped her until Argyle Centre introduced its zero rental plan. The plan is designed for people with creative ideas and can rent a shop for three months without paying rent. Ms Cheng handed in her proposal in July. After a successful interview in early August, she resigned from her previous job. The shop was finally opened in late August. "Nearly all the customers have been satisfied with their photo," she added. "Although I am busier than before and have had little time to rest, I really enjoy the moments. I am getting a lot of satisfactions from my business." Ms Joanna Tsoi, a customer of Flash Studio, said her …

November 6, 2016 - Connaught Road West, Hong Kong

  • 2016-12-15
  • 2016-12-15

by Ng Yi Shu Around 2,000 protesters took over an intersection between Western Road and Des Voeux Road West yesterday (Nov 6) to protest the Chinese government's decision to interpret the Basic Law over an oath-taking controversy. The protesters - who split from an afternoon march to the Old Supreme Court Building - attempted to gather outside the China Liaison Office, where police had set out cordons. Several attempts to breach the cordon saw police responding with a red warning flag and pepper spray. (Edited by Hilda Lo)

Have yourself a Merry Lamma Christmas

  • 2016-12-13

Treasure hunt, hiking and biking on the island for local charities by Angela Cheung, Emily Cheung and Richelia Yeung This is the 18th year for the community of Lamma Island and Operation Santa Claus collaboration to raise money for the local charities in Hong Kong. On December 4th, a bike race, a 10km marathon, a family scavenger hunt and a treasure hunt were held on the island. Robert Lockyer, the organiser of the events, said they hope to bring the community together for a good cause. He said there are around 300 to 400 participants this year. Most of them are from the island. "We have to spread out the events on the island," he said. "People even suggest additional events, so next year instead of a one-day event we will do two-days as we are hoping to do ten to twelve events next year." Mr Lockyer said it has been really busy to organise all the events, but fortunately, the members from the Lamma community are so supportive. "It's been a tradition that OSC is something Island Bar supported, so we took over that job as well," said Brad Tarr, owner of the bar, who took over it about six months ago. He said they tried to make as much money as they could by putting on bigger events this year. Mr Tarr hoped he could continue to support the campaign next year even if he could not make any profit. He also thanked those who had come to participate in the OSC events in Lamma Island this year as the events would not be here without them. "We do the event for OSC, not for us," Mr Tarr said, "If we can help a little bit these charities we will do it." Family Fun Island Scavenger Hunt The …

Culture & Leisure

All I Want for Christmas is Food: Delighting Food Tours, Sydney

by Julianna Wu Hanging out in a block that's full of nice snacks and cuisines in a sunny day, eat whatever you like until you can't have anymore. This is every foodie's dream. Especially in a city like Sydney, which has more than 20 different cultures and regions, which means, over 20 different kinds of food and cuisine? In this huge city that's approximately eleven times bigger than Hong Kong, foodies are luckily enough to have professionals that would lead them through streets and corners to find delicacies, teach them how to eat properly, and most importantly, tell them the stories behind the food and the reason why it exists. Tours led customers through various cultures' authentic restaurants and foods were started in Sydney a decade ago. Eventually it grows into a popular thing across the city. Now Sydney has up to 17 different organizations offering nearly 100 food tours around the city: ranging from focus tours on wine or chocolate to certain culture's food. Taste Food Tour is one of the companies that bring customers into the broad Western suburbs of the city for Persian, South-east Asia and other more kinds of foods with a price ranging from 400 to 600 HKD for an adult. The tour of Babylonian Delights - Fairfield for example, includes two sets of meal, two typical snacks stores, one grocery shop of the Persian or Turkish culture as well as a rich explanation of the culture background and how do people make food within a walking distance of the local suburb Fairfield. The tours' schedule has been set to meet different kinds of customers' need. Food tours in Chinatown, which is a hot tourism spot, are set during weekdays for the convenience of travelers. While far Western or outer central city food tours are …

Photo Essay

Weighing ambitions with a steelyard

  • 2016-12-11

A skill that bonded father and daughter over decades by Connie Fong People in Hong Kong may come across traditional Chinese steelyards, a type of balance, in wet markets and Chinese medicine pharmacies. Yet only a few of them know the proper way to use one, though it was the optimal tool for measuring weight in the olden days. Lee Wo Steelyard, the last store selling handmade steelyards has nestled in Yau Ma Tei for over eighty-five years although digital balances had replaced steelyards and diminished its crafting industry. "My goal is to preserve my dad's spirit and let more people understand about the beauty of steelyard", said Mrs Ho, the owner of Lee Wo Steelyard. She has been determined to keep her father's dream alive by operating his store up till this day despite having few successors in steelyard crafting. It is hard for beginners to learn the skills in the steelyard industry because the masters and seniors treat their apprentices harshly, Ho said. Her dad had gone through a tough time when he first stepped into the scene, as the requirements for making a steelyard of good quality was fairly high in the golden days. "I hate to say this but this is really a pity for me to witness this unique craft vanishing in the society", said Ho. The steelyard shop owner is unable to make any new steelyards at 76 years of age and the stock in her shop are all that she has left. There are only three to four steelyard masters left in Hong Kong and they would soon be retired as all of them are in senility, Ho said. "I wouldn't retire until the day I die because the shop is my dad's ambition in his life and I will do everything to …