Ma Jiajue

Letter from the Editor

  • 2015-11-02
  • 2015-11-02

The Young Reporter editorial team was gathered in the 24-hour computer lab (more like a lounge) one day last week putting together this issue. I was researching the Electoral Affairs Committee statistics on voter turnout and watching one of my editors scrolling on his laptop on the sofa. I looked at the group and spontaneously asked, “Who in this room has actually voted?” Among the dozen 21 and 22-year-old journalists-to-be, only one person --Joey, our copy editor--had voted in a by-election at South Horizons, Southern District West last year. All the rest will be first time voters this November. Writing an election issue with no voting experience is a double-edged sword. Having never experienced voting procedures, timelines and reporting regulations has to be compensated for with massive amounts of research and planning. But as university students, it is easier for us to relate to young candidates and young voters. And, as a female-dominated group on a female-dominated campus, we are sensitive to gender issues in politics and workplace. The system of appointed members is to be abolished starting from this election, making the District Council the only generally elected and most democratic part of the government in Hong Kong. The council itself though possesses very limited power, even on community policies and transparency in the way taxpayers’ money is spent. The people in Hong Kong are increasingly aware of their rights in politics, partly credited to the Umbrella Movement, and further reform in the District Council shall soon be appealed. Back in the lab (or lounge) one editor made the confession that she is not a registered voter and the guy on the sofa moved his stare away from the computer screen to her and let out a sigh. Crystal Tse Editor

Letter from the Editor - February 2015

  • 2015-04-19
  • 2015-04-19

  FEBRUARY is the season of love. We start this issue by capturing the Hong Kong Observation Wheel’s very first Valentine’s Day. There are also stories about the Chief Executive’s Policy Address, interesting people and almost forgotten industries. Our cover story features the youth hostel scheme proposed by the Chief Executive, looking at whether the scheme would make owning a home a more attainable goal for the younger generation. Then, our politics feature digs into educators’ concern over the government’s proposal to encourage more local schools to team up with sister schools on the Mainland. We also look into the fascinating life stories of people from different corners of society, including an impersonator of North Korea’s leader. Last but not least, you will see photo essays on the Yau Ma Tei Fruit Market and the struggling flower plaque industry. This month also marks the start of another year in the Chinese world. We wish you a happy and prosperous Year of the Goat (Or is it a Sheep? Ram?) Share your comment on our website or write to us! Carain Yeung  Editor

Letter from the Editor

  • 2015-03-24
  • 2015-03-24

FEBRUARY is the season of love. We start this issue by capturing the Hong Kong Observation Wheel’s very first Valentine’s Day. There are also stories about the Chief Executive’s Policy Address, interesting people and almost forgotten industries. Our cover story features the youth hostel scheme proposed by the Chief Executive, looking at whether the scheme would make owning a home a more attainable goal for the younger generation. Then, our politics feature digs into educators’ concern over the government’s proposal to encourage more local schools to team up with sister schools on the Mainland. We also look into the fascinating life stories of people from different corners of society, including an impersonator of North Korea’s leader. Last but not least, you will see photo essays on the Yau Ma Tei Fruit Market and the struggling flower plaque industry. This month also marks the start of another year in the Chinese world. We wish you a happy and prosperous Year of the Goat (Or is it a Sheep? Ram?) Share your comment on our website or write to us! Carain Yeung Editor

Letter from the Editor

  • 2015-02-24
  • 2015-02-24

In this January issue, our cover story features the struggles of local fishermen since the ban on trawling two years ago and their call for alternative forms of govern- ment aid. After looking at the sunset industry, you will see other exciting stories, including the feature on the new business idea connecting smart phones and traditional toys, an inspiring profile of the hat designer to the stars, volunteers who bring Star Wars heroes to life, and more. Next, we look at the artistic meaning and value of tattoos beyond the symbol of rebellious, and the reasons behind the popularity of working holidays among young people. Last but not least, our photo essay brings you to the forgotten corners of Kowloon City and you will hear from those who have witnessed the changes of the community through the years. Last year was a great one with your support. We are devoted to bringing you more quality stories in 2015. Stay tuned and write to us! Carain Yeung Editor

Letter from the Editor - 2014 November issue

  • 2014-12-09
  • 2014-12-09

TODAY, as this November issue goes to press on 19th November, marks day 53 of the Umbrella Revolution. While public attention seemed to be all on the development of the movement, the government was initiating public consultation on different legislations. In this November issue, our cover story features the review of Race Dis- crimination Ordinance – whether the scope of the ordinance should be ex- tended to outlaw discrimination to- wards mainlanders, who belong to the same ethnic group as Hongkongers. Following are features of different issues in society, including the pitfall of the government’s project to revitalise old buildings into artists’ workshops, the career prospect of retired athletes and how a smartphone became an in- vestment product. Coming next, we have one of the seven organ transplant coordinators in the city to share the moving stories at her career, and an online political car- toonist to talk about the inspirations behind his successful series “The Boiling Frog”. We ought not to overlook health issues, even with much political hap- penings in the background. With Chungking Mansions being a popu- lar choice of accommodation among tourists from the Ebola-affected countries, we look at the threat of the deadly disease to the building, and eventually the whole city. Our team also brings you an international sport that has taken over different corners of our city – street workout. We end this issue with a photo essay of the occupied sites in Admi- ralty, looking at how the protesters have been walking through the move- ment. As the protesters and the gov- ernment could not reach to compro- mise following the open conversation in late October, the movement con- tinues and our team will continue to cover the latest developments. Please stay tuned to our Facebook page and Twitter for timely updates. …

Letter from the Editor - 2014 September and October Issue

  • 2014-10-14
  • 2014-10-14

THIS September and October have been unusual for Hong Kong, with the Occupy Central with Love and Peace movement paralysing parts of the city. The Young Reporter team has made timely coverage of this historic and unprecedented campaign, which has been dubbed the “Umbrella Revo- lution” by international media. In this issue, you will learn how the movement evolved from an idea proposed by an academic to a mass movement, with tens of thousands of protesters blocking key roads to put pressure on the government to intro- duce genuine democratic reforms. Our cover story explores the sen- timents towards Beijing’s decision on constitutional reform and how a week- long class boycott organised by tertiary students joined forces with the occupy movement. Then we take a look at why Central has not really been occupied while other areas are. Protesters say they have taken to the street to fight for a better society. Yet, their civil diso- bedience camapign has also drawn widespread criticism. The Young Re- porter presents to you how ordinary citizens and various sectors think of the movement. We have also talked to the chair- person of the Civic Party, Ms Audrey Eu, to tap her views on Hong Kong’s political situation, and lawmaker and veteran protester Mr Leung Kwok- hung, who shares his experience with first-time protesters and organisers. As the Umbrella Revolution goes on, The Young Reporter will continue to keep a close eye on the situation and provide live updates via social media. Please like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more. Editor-in-chief Brian Yap

Letter from the editor (June Issue)

  • 2014-06-14
  • 2014-06-14

In the June issue, our cover story features the problem of child abuse – not on the physical or sexual levels but psychological abuse – and the possibility of the legislation of the “Cinderella Law” in Hong Kong after Britain. You will also see a wide range of stories on different issues, including the shortage of public services workers, short ends of special education in Hong Kong, local religious culture of freeing captive animals and more. Last but not least, this issue of The Young Reporter brings you to the mysterious nations of North Korea and Myanmar with pictures of bits of the local lives – taken by our team who visited the countries in April and May. Please check out our website for more and leave us some comments on our stories or tell us what story ideas you want us to explore!

Latest June Issuu- 2014

  • 2014-06-14
  • 2014-06-14

Editorial Board 2014-2015

  • 2014-06-13
  • 2014-06-13

  Chief Editor: Carain Yeung Deputy Chief Editors: Alpha Chan, Karen Lee, Steven Wang Distribution Officer: Alice Wan Public Relations Officer: Josie Wong Art Directors: Shirley Chan, Tiffany Ng, Vicky Wan Copyeditors: Karen Leung, Tsau Jin Cheng Web Editors: Aska Cheong, Katrina Yau    

Letter from the Editor

  • 2014-05-04
  • 2014-05-04

In the April issue, we shed light on the long-neglected issue of child poverty that has seen one in five children fall below the city’s poverty line in recent years. With the proposed plan to launch 15 years of free education still in its infancy, the government has continued to overlook the plight of our city’s underprivileged children by dragging its feet on the establishment of a child commission championed by lawmakers. We also give you an inside look at what’s behind the scenes of brightly-lit nightclubs across town, as our reporters have discovered the burgeoning practice of recruiting foreign exchange students as facilitators, who are secretly paid for bringing in other young overseas customers. On the business front, we offer a glimpse into the emergence of the octopus card to as a means of payment for online shopping, made possible by the partnership between the city’s Octopus Cards Limited and China’s online shopping giant Taobao, and whether it would pose a potential threat to local banks. Editor-in-chief Brian Yap