Occupy Central

Rallying call for change

  • 2014-10-21
  • 2014-10-21

[slideshow_deploy id='1629']   The class boycott is about: Refusing to watch with apathy; Taking the first step towards striking back against oppression; Re-grouping the masses at a fresh starting point; Urging Hong Kong people to reflect on their own fate; and Appealing to the older generation to heed the calls of young people. We absolutely do not accept our fate, as we are determined to get back our future and be the masters of our own destiny.  Excerpt from the Hong Kong Federation of Students' declaration on class boycott    WITH the release of this declaration, tertiary students launched the biggest-ever class boycott in Hong Kong's history on September 22. The class boycott was kicked off by a mass rally attended by estimated 13,000 students at the University mall of the Chinese University on September 22. With yellow ribbons pinned on their white clothes to symbolize their pursuit of "genuine" universal suffrage and peace, the students called for a revocation of the NPC resolution. While they boycotted classes, the students said they would not stop learning and announced plans to invite scholars from different disciplines to give public lectures. More than 10 lectures a day were held from September 23 at Tamar Park and two other protest sites near the Central Government Office and Legislative Council Complex. On September 26, some secondary school students joined the class boycott on the initiation of student-activist group Scholarism. Things took a dramatic turn in the evening, when Scholarism convenor Mr Joshua Wong Chi-fung urged the crowd to break into the front plaza of the government headquarters. Known as Civic Square, the plaza was recently closed to the public, and Mr Wong said the break-in was aimed at "recovering" the public space for the masses. Scores of students who managed to get into the …

The Umbrella Revolution

  • 2014-10-21
  • 2014-10-21

[slideshow_deploy id='1624']   SINCE September 28, umbrellas have become a symbol of the fight for democracy in Hong Kong. That day, occupy movement protesters fended off pepper spray and tear gas with umbrellas when police tried to disperse the crowd occupying a main road in Admiralty, the financial hub of the city. The movement has since been dubbed the "Umbrella Revolution". The movement was originally a pro-democracy campaign called Occupy Central with Love and Peace, scheduled for October 1. It called on people to stage a sit-in protest in Central aimed at forcing Beijing to give true universal suffrage for the Chief Executive election in 2017, as opposed to the one that Beijing proposed which screens candidates. University students staged a week-long class boycott and protested outside the government headquarters to demand true democracy. The protest took a turn when police tried to clear the scene using pepper spray and tear gas. More people took to the streets with their umbrellas condemning the police action.   Reported By Mari Chow Edited by Natalie Leung

[Video] Cash in on charitable donations

  • 2014-03-19
  • 2014-03-19

Reported by Tina Cheung and Yanis Chan According to the Law Reform Commission, the number of charitable organisations in Hong Kong has almost tripled from 1996 to 2010. With more and more charitable donations being made, the public has become increasingly concerned with where all their money actually goes. The video focuses on the legal issues related to the transparency of charitable funds and how donations raised by such organisations are utilised. The Young Reporter set up a vox pop interview at Kowloon Tong MTR station where a couple of charitable organisations usually set up booths to raise money. Randomly selected interviewees were asked about their perception of how charities use their funds and what they think can be done to make their donations worthwhile. Mr Sidney Lee Chi-hang, a lawyer and councilor of Central & Western District was also interviewed. Providing legal advice on the possibilities and restrictions for setting up a centralised law to monitor the finance of charitable organisations, Mr Lee also laid out some alternatives as to how these organisations can be regulated without a comprehensive law term. Edited by Giselle Chan For text story please click here

[Video] Young men ringing doorbells of sex workers

  • 2014-03-19
  • 2014-03-19

Reported by ShanShan Kao and Jackson Ho Peter, a 26-year-old logistics worker, explained to The Young Reporter why he prefers sex workers to a girlfriend. In this processed video, Peter says as he smokes that he sees patronising brothels as the most efficient way to satisfy his needs. Having been frequenting sex workers for more than ten years, he says he has been used to this lifestyle. Love is necessary, he says, but love without sex is unacceptable. Ching Ching, a sex worker The Young Reporter approached through outspoken sex worker rights group Ziteng, says in this interview filmed at the group's office in Mong Kok that men are spared the financial and psychological burdens in paid sex. She says some men prefer having sex with sex workers because of the mutually agreed precondition that no commitment or promise of commitment will be involved at any point of the encounter. She calls it "lucky" for men to have a girlfriend who does not ask for "pocket money." The number of female sex workers in Hong Kong is estimated to be at 20,000, according to Ziteng. Mong Kok alone has about 500 brothels, motels, and massage parlours, accommodating more than 1,000 sex workers and serving 10,000 to 20,000 clients per day, the group says. Organised prostitution is illegal under Hong Kong law. But one-woman brothels where one sex worker provides sex services in her apartment are allowed. Video Editor: Rachel Leung For the text story, click here

Cover Story: In God we occupy, say religious leaders

  • 2013-10-14
  • 2013-10-14

  Local Christian activists are leading the Occupy Central campaign, triggering a debate over whether their religious convictions will have skewed the civil disobedience movement deemed as Hong Kong's last-ditch attempt to win universal suffrage.