By: Elly Wu、Kobie Li、Michelle Ng、Wing Li、Yoyo Chow、Zinnia LeeEdited by: Holly Chik

Politics

Carrie Lam in office for 16 months: What have been achieved?

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Elly Wu、Kobie Li、Michelle Ng、Wing Li、Yoyo Chow、Zinnia LeeEdited by: Holly Chik
  • 2018-10-10

Infogram Education Infogram Healthcare Infogram Infogram Relations with the mainland Infogram Copy: Welfare Infogram Welfare Infogram

Locals and foreigners get together for the fireworks show

  • 2018-10-02
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Amy Ho、Phoebe Lai、Nadia LamEdited by: Angie Chan、Elisa Luk、Michelle Ng
  • 2018-10-02

To celebrate the 69th birthday of the People's Republic of China, 2018 National Day Fireworks Display was held in Victoria Harbour on Monday night for people from all over the world to enjoy. Visitors came early this afternoon to get the best view. They waited outside the Hong Kong Cultural Centre for the fireworks which started at 9 pm. Ms. Phan, a local Hongkonger who brought her children here to enjoy the event, arrived at 4 pm. She had planned to play with them during the hours waiting. She said this is the third time for her children to watch the fireworks and they love it very much. Other than locals who were excited about the show, visitors from different parts of the world, such as mainland China, Germany, and Indonesia joined in the celebration as well. Mr. Rui from Beijing took the opportunity of the long holiday to enjoy the fireworks celebration because he likes the beautiful view of the fireworks, as well as other things Hong Kong has to offer. "You can smell the smoke [of the fireworks] at the scene," he said. He is going to stay in Hong Kong for a week. As a nature lover, he would be going to Tung Lung Chau in the coming few days. Another visitor from Germany, Mr. Mohr and his friend, would be ending their three-day-trip in Hong Kong with the fireworks show, joining the show coincidentally. In the four hours before the show, they are going to get their luggage to prepare for their departure. The fireworks show lasted approximately 23 minutes. A total of 31, 888 firing shells were discharged from four barges. The fireworks cost around $10 million. This morning, a series of events were held to mark the 69th anniversary, the flag-raising ceremony and a …

Politics

Hundreds mark fourth year since Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement

Several hundred people gathered outside the Hong Kong government headquarters this evening marking the four-year anniversary of the start of the mass pro-democracy Umbrella Movement, as worries prevail that freedom of political expression is being increasingly muzzled by Beijing. In 2014, tens of thousands occupied major roadways in Admiralty, Causeway Bay and Mong Kok for 79 days starting from September 28 rallying for "genuine universal suffrage" and democratic reform in the highly autonomous city’s leadership elections. The crowds raised yellow umbrellas, the movement's symbol, and held a three-minute silence at 5:58 pm today as audio recordings during the movement was played back on loudspeakers to commemorate the moment when the Hong Kong police began to blast 87 tear gas canisters at the unarmed protesters four years ago. "Hongkongers keep fighting," the crowds chanted. Former teacher Jenny Woo told Hong Kong people to look ahead, saying the present political climate was different from four years ago. "I joined [the remembrance event] because the youth are our future," said Ms Zeng, 55, a mainland immigrant who moved to the city just before the movement. Having participated in the Mong Kok occupation, Ms Zeng said she had been moved by a documentary she watched a week before about the movement. Supporters also applauded the nine defendants, including Occupy advocates Benny Tai Yiu-ting and Chan Kin-man, for the upcoming trial for the movement in November. "I have no regrets at all," Professor Chan told the crowds. He regarded the movement as "the most glorious moment" of his life. "We could not shake the regime," activist Joshua Wong Chi-fung said on stage. "But at least we could inspire people's hearts." In the past few days, local pro-Beijing media have continuously slammed the Umbrella Movement for crippling the city's rule of law and polarising the society. …

Society

Defence suspected induction and insufficient evidence in cement-coffin murder

At the body-in-cement case trial at The Court of First Instance yesterday, defence barrister Steve Tsui attempted to prove that the defendants were induced by the police as the court awaits possible new evidence. "Did you ever say (to the defendant) 'I heard you are a fighter, do you want to fight me now'?" Mr. Tsui asked a police officer who investigated this case and is called upon as witness, "and when the defendant asked to see a lawyer, did you ever hear your fellow investigator say 'don't play games with me, you are in a police station, no lawyer can help you now'?" The officer denied that the above conversation took place, and said that he never heard his fellow investigator make such statement as far as he knows. Mr. Tsui went on to ask him if he ever punched the forearm of the defendant and heard his fellow investigator suggest that the defendant should "perform well" in a videotaped interview to alleviate his sentence, but Mr. Lee still denied the claims. The barrister also questioned chief inspector Wesly Tse Tan-sang on the same topic which Mr. Tse said, "I wanted to find out the identity of those involved as soon as possible. It is the duty of the police." Tse was also interrogated on the process of how he "accompanied" the suspects back to Hong Kong from Taiwan and the procedures of their arrests, which he replied everything strictly abode to the rules and regulations of the police department and suspects were treated fairly. However, Mr.Tse confirmed that there is no eyewitness to this case, and only circumstantial evidence was present at the initial stage of their arrest. So far, the three suspects had admitted to "part-taking" the murder of Cheung Man-Li, but none confessed to the deed. The barrister …

Politics

Will School Social Workers be a Panacea for Child Abuse Problem?

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Amy Ho、Wallis WangEdited by: Erica Chin、Jade Li、Japson Melanie Jane、Wing Li
  • 2018-03-14

With scabs covered all over her limbs and face, bedsores on the soles of her feet and bruises all over her body, a 5-year-old girl died in January from being repeatedly abused by her father and stepmother. Lam Lam’s life was full of sorrow, pain, and tears. But she was just one of many child abuse cases that happened in Hong Kong. According to government statistics, there have been more than 800 cases of child abuse every year in Hong Kong since 2006. The data also shows that more than half of the victims were abused by their parents. According to Dr. Louis Kok, Child and Forensic Psychologist of Hong Kong Institute for Children’s Mental Health, children tend not to report abuses by their parents because they want to protect and stay with them. Since 2000, every secondary school has to have at least one social worker. Law Chi-kwong, Secretary for Labour and Welfare has suggested extending the policy to primary schools and kindergartens. Social workers who work for primary schools nowadays are not only in charge of students’ guidance services, but also their activities, according to Emy Law Yee-ming, member of the Reclaiming Social Work Movement and the social worker of a local primary school. She said that social workers have to spend time on other duties so they do not have enough time for counselling. "They have to deal with after-class care, arrange extra-curricular activities for students, prepare, contact and make other arrangements as well as to recruit students to join activities," said the social worker Law. Ip Kin-yuen, a member of the Legislative Council and the vice-president of Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union, hoped that the new policy would help social workers in primary schools to be employed under a new long-term contract system. Mr. Ip said …

Build an Active Hong Kong Through Healthy Urban Planning

  • 2018-03-14

Jeff Tsang Pui-san, a 19-year-old Hongkonger, seldom exercises. The only chance he gets to work out is during his daily commute, running from his home to the metro station for about 10 minutes. "I live in Cheung Sha Wan, a densely populated district in Hong Kong. Although there is a sports ground near my home, it is usually occupied by trainings as well as athletic meets," Mr. Tsang said. "When it is opened to (the) public, it would be packed with people. This makes it difficult for me to jog there." Mr. Tsang’s level of physical activity is far below the standard recommended by the Hong Kong government, that is, to exercise at least 30 minutes a day. Like Mr. Tsang, one-third of the respondents in a  survey conducted by the Chinese University of Hong Kong. said they rarely or did not exercise in the past six months. Yet according to the Planning Department, 2.3 % of the land, equivalent to twice the size of Hong Kong International Airport, is zoned for recreation and sports. An international study conducted by Professor James Sallis of the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of California found that urban planning is an important element to encourage people to exercise. The findings also indicated residents who live in activity-friendly environments could achieve 68 to 89 minutes more physical activities a week than others. The report said that people who live in walkable neighbourhoods that are densely populated, have interconnected streets, and are close to shops, services, restaurants, public transport, and parks, tend to be more physically active than those in less walkable areas. This is because a less car-dependent lifestyle means people are more likely to walk. Apart from safety, jobs and access to services, Paul Zimmerman, a district councillor …

Society

A rundown of the recent events regarding the Putonghua incident at HKBU

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Yoyo Chow、Michelle Ng、Holly ChikEdited by: Michael Shum、Angie Chan、Ezra Cheung
  • 2018-01-25

Two students at Hong Kong Baptist University were suspended on Wednesday after "occupying" the Language Centre. The incident happened a week after the release of the results of the Putonghua exemption test, in which 70% of the students who took the test failed. About 30 students headed to the Language Centre and occupied the centre for eight hours. Students' Union president Lau Tsz-kei later admitted that he spoke a Cantonese swear word during the exchange with an official from the Language Centre. The University described in a mass email four days after the event that the language used by the student was "abusive" and that their behaviour was "hostile". According to the mass email to all students, staff and alumni, two students were suspended from school "based on evidence currently available" because they "have been found to have conducted themselves in a way that made our colleagues feel threatened and insulted." They have been suspended from attending classes and exams but allowed to set foot on the University's premises. The University also said "their actions had also affected the normal operation of the University and seriously violated the Student Standards of Conduct."     What is the Putonghua graduation requirement? According to the Language Centre of Hong Kong Baptist University, it is stated that all "undergraduate students are required to reach foundation Putonghua proficiency before they graduate". They can either pass a 3-unit Putonghua course offered by the Language Centre or take a 25-hour non-credit bearing course and pass a Proficiency Test conducted by the Language Centre. To be exempted from the requirement, students have to meet one of the following criteria: Non-Chinese speaking students Attended the Chinese Language examination in the Mainland or Taiwan Have attained Grade C or above in the HKCEE Putonghua subject Have passed the Test of …