The Young Reporter

Photo Essay

Final days of the fabric bazaar

  by Flavia Wong Chan Yu-tung, also known as "Uncle Tung", 82, is the oldest hawker in the Yen Chow Street Hawker Bazaar in Sham Shui Po, where he has worked for decades. He still enjoys his work in the market, although he says the environment is not ideal – the small fabric market was built with plastic and iron sheets and is packed with fabric bolts. But that all may soon come to an end if the government gets its way. In August, the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department sent letters to hawkers saying it was planning to resume the land for building 200 units under the Home Ownership Scheme, according to a report by local media Apple Daily. Hawkers with a license may have the choice of compensation of $80,000, lower than the normal $120,000, if they return the licenses back to the government, or they will be offered a stall in other markets. Yet, among the 190 tenants, only 21 of them actually have government licenses, according to Cable TV's report. These hawkers will receive no compensation. Tung has no license. "The government has not talked to us, the tenants, yet. We have no idea how they would settle us, or if they would compensate us," he said. He added that he will miss the market if it is closed. Since the 1970s, the fabric market has been the paradise of fashion students. They have also expressed their reluctance to part with the market. Some university graduates even take photos in the market in their graduation gown. "We can find varieties of fabrics here and they are very cheap. Hawkers are also very nice to us. It actually nurtures many students," said Chee Ka-po, a graduate of Bachelor of Fashion and Textile Studies, Hong Kong Polytechnic University. …

Culture & Leisure

Is Hong Kong ready for street art?

  by Herbert Cheung Salmon swimming upstream, snowboarding and rock climbing: just some of the paintings you see on staircases in Tsuen Wan town centre. But are people in Hong Kong ready to welcome community arts with open arms? "In Hong Kong, more people are interested in popular culture than in crafts, such as tea making, ceramic and handicrafts," said Lam Yuk-fai, leader of the artist group, Omni Art. Their members have been painting the murals around Tsuen Wan. "Most of the shops are monopolised by tycoons, leaving no room to promote arts and culture. It is hard for artists to blossom here," he said. Mr Lam thinks Hong Kong does not provide a fostering environment for art, compared with Taiwan and mainland China. Mr Lam believes community art is a great stepping stone to promote art in Hong Kong. But it takes a time for people to develop an interest. His group has been working with the Home Affairs Bureau, but Mr Lam there is not enough government support. He believes Hong Kong has the potential for further art development because it is the world's fourth largest art auction market. According to the Contemporary Art Market Report 2015 published by Artprice, more than $146 million dollars' worth of contemporary art was auctioned off between July 2014 and June 2015. Denise Yeung Tsz-ching, one of the five artists of Omni Art, said residents in Tsuen Wan used to call the police when the artists were working on the stairs because they thought they were vandalising. "We didn't put up any signs stating that the activity was sponsored and approved by the District Council. So there was some misunderstanding," said the 20-year-old artist. "The visibility of the murals allow people to appreciate and participate in art as they walk on the stairs or stop to take photos", Ms Yeung said. Lo Siu-kit, a Tsuen Wan district councillor, thinks murals on stairs are ‘interesting', even though painting the three stairs cost $100,000, according to the council's meeting document. "These may be small changes, but people feel different about the stairs," …

Youngsters with special needs go for goal in soccer fundraiser

  • 2015-12-08

By Aaron Au and Alvin Kor This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1NDEHy0. Read full story by SCMP reporter at http://bit.ly/1SKEI3f. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.  

Ideal life with community supports at IDEAL

  • 2015-12-06

By Arisa Lai and Julianna Wu.   Charity IDEAL (Intellectually Disabled Education and Advocacy League) help people with intellectual disabilities and their families through training courses, education activities and provide them with community support. This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1XSqpej. Read full story by SCMP reporter at http://bit.ly/1Nfrt6M. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.  

Kids in red for charity walk to support OSC

  • 2015-12-03

By Herbert Cheung and Sharon Tang.   Kids dressing in red from Discovery Mind International Kindergarten raise cash for OSC through a charity walk. This video is also published on SCMP at http://on.fb.me/1SxYBdR. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.  

Four-legged friends help disabled teen to run deep and feel liberating

  • 2015-11-30

By ShanShan Kao, Tanya McGovern and Crystal Tse. Eighteen-year-old Paralympic dressage star Natasha Tse Pui-ting gets the feeling of running on a horse. This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1TnL1dC. Check full story at http://bit.ly/1IvBScv. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.

Christmas tunes cheer children from silent families as they sing

  • 2015-11-29

By ShanShan Kao and Viola Zhou.   From a hearing impaired family without speech, these children with full hearing or impaired sing their Christmas wishes using both verbal and sign languages. This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1Q7nr4T. Check full story at http://bit.ly/1XqvAHu. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.    

Disabled on land, free at the sea: Sailing over disabilities

  • 2015-11-25

By Christy Leung and Viola Zhou.   Sailability offers people with disabilities the opportunity to face new ocean-borne challenges, and sportswoman eyes Paralympics. This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1lTQTQK. Check full story at http://bit.ly/1XCAImp. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.  

Cardboard sleigh ride as a team-building challenge

  • 2015-11-23

By Tsui-see Au Yeung and Joanna Wong Ho-yan. Participants build and drag homemade cardboard sleighs at first Operation Santa Claus Sleigh Ride Challenge. This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1NiDdVn. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.  

Squash players dress up and keep running for charity campaign

  • 2015-11-22

By Catherine Chen and Sharon Shi.   Wing Ding participants dress up for the tournament playing 11 non-stop squash games in a bid to raise HK$1 million for the Operation Santa Claus charity campaign. This video is also published on SCMP at http://bit.ly/1HDdI5a. Read full story at http://bit.ly/1NFPxVX. Operation Santa Claus, the city's annual fund-raising campaign jointly organised by South China Morning Post SCMP and RTHK Radio 3 Hong Kong.