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Myanmar people march to demand peace to "stop war"

  • 2017-05-24
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Holly Chik、Wing Li、Dorothy MaEdited by: Cecilia Wong、Isabella Lo
  • 2017-05-24

Thousands of citizens protested against multiple domestic wars happening in the north where most ethnic groups live on February 5, demanding a peaceful Myanmar, said a leading demonstrator. About 7,000 people marched in downtown Yangon in February, carrying toy guns and poems, to protest the long-running civil war in northern Myanmar. The protesters marched to Maha Bandula Park and distributed leaflets printed a poem titled "I Hate the War So Much", expressing their discontentment with several civil wars happening in Myanmar. Conflicts between ethnic-minority militias and government forces have been flaring high up in northern Myanmar for feuds, competition over natural resources, and demands for more autonomy, dating back to the end of the second world war and the end of British colonial rule in 1948. Myanmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been trying to forge a nation- wide peace agreement between all ethnic groups after years of war in Myanmar's many border regions, but ethnic minorities have a deep-rooted mistrust of the central government. Many student unions and volunteers from non-governmental organizations participated in the demonstration, which was organized via Facebook, while, dating back a few years ago, Myanmar has no comprehensive internet network across its boundary. "We come here because we want peace... My parents don't allow me to go, but I am here. If there is a next one, I would like to join because of peace," said Sad Un San, a 16-year old student at East Yangon University. He said he came to the demonstration to demand peace and condemn the raging wars across Myanmar with his junior classmates who are about 15 years old. "In our country, people are fighting for no reason", said Hah Eie, a law student from Dagon University who distributed food and drinks to pro- testers for free as a …

  • 2017-04-03
  • 2017-04-03

2016 Hong Kong Legco Election Candidates

  • 2016-09-04
  • 2016-09-04

Hong Kong Island   Wong Chi-him Lau Gar-hung Chritopher Ip Lau Suk-yee Regina Ho Sau-lan Cyd Cheung Kwok-kwan Chim Pui-chung Cheng Kam-mun Law Kwun-chung Shum Chee-chiu Wong Wai-kay Chui Chi-kin Zimmerman Paulus Johannes Hui Chi-fung Tanya Chan Kwok Wai-keung   Kowloon West Ng Man-yuen Ho Chi-kwong Mo Man-ching Cladia Leung Mei-fun Tam Kwok-kiu Chu Siu-hung Wong Yuk-man Wong Pik-wan Lam Yi-lai Chiang Lai-wan Kwan San-wai Lau Siu-Lai Yau Wai-ching Lee Wing-hon Tik Chi-yuen   Kowloon East Wong Kwok-kin Wu Sui-shan Ko Tat-pun Tam Heung-man Tse Wai-chun Or Ching-shing Lui Wing-kei Wu Chi-wai Tam Man-ho Wong Yeung-tat Chan Chak-to Tam Tak-chi   New Territories West   Wong Yun-tat Wan Siu-kin Ko Chi-fai Chow Wing-kan Cheng Chung-tai Kwong Koon-wan Tien Micheal Puk-sun Ho Kwan-yiu Leung Che-cheung Kwok Ka-ki Wong Ho-ming Lee Cheuk-yan Wong Chun-kit Mak Mei-kuen Fung Kin-kee Chan Han-pan Cheung Wai-ching Lui Chi-hang Tong Wing-chi Chu Hoi-dick   New Territories East   Fong Kwok-chan Lam Cheuk-ting Liu Tin-shing Chin Wan-kan Leung Kwok-hung Cheung Chiu-hung Yeung Alvin Ngok-kiu Mak Ka-chun Cheng Kar-foo Quat Elizabeth Hau Chi-keung Lee Tsz-king Tang Ka-piu Fan Gary Kwok-wai Chan Yuk Ngor Wong Sum-yu Lee See-yin Chan Chi-chuen Leung Chung-hang Leung Kam-shing Yung Hoi-yan Chan Hak-kan

Running for Life

  • 2016-01-10
  • 2016-01-10

  by Sharon Tang Jogging may seem like an afforadable way to get fit, but there are risks. According to a 2014 study by the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Lehigh Valley Health Network in Pennsylvania, people who live longest only do a moderate amount of exercise. That menas two to three hours of running a week. Researchers looked at more than 3,800 joggers. They found that those who jog a lot or not at all have shorter lifespans .than moderate joggers. Another research by the American College of Cardiology in February 2015 mentioned that training too hard might be as bad as not putting on your running shoes at all. The study suggested jogging at a steady pace for less than two and a half hours a week is best for health. Here in Hong Kong, the annual Hong Kong Marathon sponsored by Standard Chartered has seen more and more participants in recent years. For the 2016 marathon, 15,500 places were all gone in two and a half hours. "When welfare organizations promote the advantages of exercise, more people become aware of their health," said Lobo Louie Hung-tak, Associate Professor of Physical Education atHong Kong Baptist University. "Jogging, for instance, is easy because you need don't need any facilities," he said. "Joggers' injuries are not that serious. Maybe it is exagerrated by the media ," Dr Louie suggested. But he admitted there is a lack of data on joggers. Dr Louie explained that there is a causal relationship between training time and the probability of getting injured while jogging. He said that competition should not be considered as a way to show off one's talent, but should be about commitment to training . A 10 kilometer marathon for example requires at least three months' preparation. "Some people blame on the host organization of the marathon that they are injured. That is unethical," Dr Louie said. Bobo Lau Po-yu loves running and strarted going into competition when she was in secondary school. She has been running long distance for seven …

Beijing official's remark on CE's 'overriding' powers drawn divided comments

  • 2015-09-16
  • 2015-09-16

By Kyle Sun The top Beijing official in Hong Kong Zhang Xiaoming said during a seminar last Saturday that the Chief Executive is "above the executive, legislative and judicial." Zhang, the current chief of the central government's Liaison Office said that separation of the three powers is not meant to be exercised in the local government system, instead is only a reference to the SAR. "The Chief Executive's dual responsibility [to both Hong Kong and Beijing] means he has a special legal position which is above the executive, legislative and judicial institutions," Zhang said to law scholars and experts on a seminar marking 25th anniversary of the promulgation of Basic Law. The pro-Beijing camp took Zhang's comments as explaining and promoting the Basic Law to the public. Regina Ip Lau Suk-yee, lawmaker and chairwoman of the New People's Party, said that there is no need for worries that the Chief Executive may have dominating power. "The Judiciary is independent and it operates entirely on its own," she said during a radio show. "The administration is subject to daily monitoring by the legislature, which is becoming more and more powerful, for example through filibustering." She added that the CE does enjoy a supreme position in the local constitutional structure according to the Basic Law. Lawmaker Priscilla Leung Mei-fun, from the Business and Professionals Alliance for Hong Kong, believed that Zhang was referring to the chief executive's special position in liaising between the central government and Hong Kong instead of the control over the three powers. Pan-democrats think otherwise. Alan Leong Kah-kit, the Civic Party leader and lawmaker, told the South China Morning Post that Zhang was making the CE "an emperor" and the chairperson Emily Lau Wai-hing said Zhang had misinterpreted the Basic Law. Convenor of the Path of Democracy and solicitor Ronny Tong Ka-wah said during a …

Localist Arrested At Anti Parallel Trading Protest

  • 2015-09-09
  • 2015-09-09

By Jane Cheung About 150 protesters participated in an anti-parallel trading demonstration in Sheung Shui in the afternoon on September 6 afternoon, resulting in an arrest of a localist group member of a localist group. The march was co-organised by a Sheung Shui community organisation and Local League which aims to express disapproval to parallel trading actions on behalf of Sheung Shui residents. Protesters marched around Sheung Shui, causing s Some pharmacies to shut their front gates as to avoid the parade that marched around Sheung Shui.  They Protestors urged passing by Sheung Shui residents who echoed their views to join the march. The group returned to Sheung Shui MTR station where more than ten parallel trading supporters gathered after an hour and a half. The protesters from two views had a shouty encounter despite being separated by a police-formed human barricade. Mr. Ray Wong Toi-yeung of the Hong Kong Indigenous, a localist group that participated in the protest, was arrested for allegedly assaulting a police officer on a footbridge near Sheung Shui MTR station. Mr Wong thanked his supporters outside Sheung Shui Police Station after he was released on bail at 11.30pm on Sunday. "Our defiance is worth it because of your support, and your actions had successfully asserted pressure to police," he said to his supporters. He then showed off his injuries accusing police of unnecessary violence on a police vehicle during the arrest. The two organisers issued a press release highlighting their concern over the potential smuggle of mooncakes as Mid-Autumn Festival approaches. They also criticised the recently launched "one week one visit" policy for failing to eliminate parallel trading actions. Mr. Peter Lam Kin-ngok, Tourism Board Chairman, told the South China Morning Post that protests would lead to a decrease of tourists visiting Hong Kong and …

People

Stand By Me singer Ben E. King died at 76

  • 2015-05-02

'Stand By Me' singer Ben E. King at age 76, has died of natural cause at his home in New Jersey. The R&B singer had 21 songs charted on the Billboard Hot 100 between 1961 and 1975, including the notable 'Stand By Me', 'Spanish Harlem', 'Amor', 'Do it in the name of love'. More on Ben E King Chart history on Billboard Earlier this year, King's version of the classic song by the U.S. Library of Congress to the National Recording Registry, saying 'It was King's incandescent vocal that made it a classic.' Born in North Carolina, King started his career as the male vocal of  The Drifters in 1950s, singing hits like 'Save the Last Dance for Me' and 'The Magic Moment'. In 1988, the band was inducted into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

One Moment

  • 2015-04-17
  • 2015-04-17

The Hong Kong Observation Wheel in Central welcomes its first Valentine's Day by attracting couples to record their moments of joy. The 60 metres tall big-O is expected to attract one million visitors in the first year of operation. By The Young Reporter Photo by Vicky Wan

The government shall cut down sweeteners and save up for the ageing society, scholars say

  • 2015-03-01
  • 2015-03-01

Financial Secretary Mr John Tsang Chun-wah announced sweeteners totalling $34 billion and rolling out a Future Fund with an initial of $220billion in the budget 2015. An academic said the one-off relief measures have comprehensively covered the need of different classes. "The Secretary has an easier job to do when there is a colossal budget surplus," Professor Terence Chong Tai-leung, executive director of the Institute of Global Economics and Finance of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, said, "Giving out sweeteners shall impress the citizens." While a salaries tax rebate and an increased child allowance ease the burden of many Hongkongers, Prof Chong said Mr Tsang's proposal left out the multiple have-nots. "People living in the cubicle flats cannot benefit from the reduction in rates and salaries tax, not even the waiver of the rent of public housings." Prof Chong suggested the government not to continue handing sweeteners every year as it will generate an expectation from (or among?) the people. Dr Chung Kim-wah, the assistant professor in the Department of Applied Social Sciences of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, agrees on the cut-down of sweeteners. He told TYR last Friday that such measures were like launching "fireworks" and showed the government's "short-sightedness". He added that as the Secretary had once disclosed the notion of gradually removing these one-off relief measures as a policy goal, the proposal of increasing the "sweetness" this year was "self-contradictory". Dr Chung also examined the special waivers tackling the Occupy Central-affected tourism and hospitality industry. He said the small amount of money would not help the small businesses much, while the corporate owners could get a huge benefit. Dr Chung pointed out that the government was "seemingly rewarding those whom supported the government during the Occupy movement", even with an unintentional cause. Rather than spending …

A young designer critised the $500m from the Budget may harm HK's fashion industry as a whole

  • 2015-02-28
  • 2015-02-28

Financial Secretary John Tsang announced that $500 million is earmarked for fashion industry to nourish local talents. However, a local designer criticises that the fund may harm the field as a whole. The fund will be put into promoting local designers at both local and overseas events. More overseas internships and study opportunities will be offered to fashion graduates and an incubation program will be started to assist young fashion start-ups. Terry Fung, a 24-year-old designer and merchandiser at a fashion trading company, desired being subsidised for an overseas fashion show or exhibition the most. "An entry-level overseas fashion show can take up to $1 million. An [overseas] exhibition will at least cost $300,000 to $400,000," he added. However, he thinks that subsidising young talents to go overseas can be a dilemma as there is a tendency which fresh bloods will retain at established companies overseas after the internship or study abroad programme. Fung said that funds has long been available for local fashion passionate to participate in overseas fashion shows and exhibitions. A lack of networking is a bigger root of the less vivid fashion industry in Hong Kong. He proposes that the government, for example Hong Kong Trade Development Council can help lining up local and foreign designers for fashion shows to gain international exposure. He suggests altering the focus of fashion education from stressing on how to run of an established company to how to build a personal brand because fashion industry in Hong Kong is mainly dominated by a few local designer brands and fast fashion. Ms Alice Chu Wai-ching, the Assistant Professor at Institute of Textiles and Clothing at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University supports the injection which allows graduates-to-be participating in activities to widen their horizon and thus taking a step to the international platform. …