hkbu

National day firework draws hundreds of thousands

  • 2017-10-02

As part of the 68th National Day celebrations, 31,888 pyrotechnic shells were fired from five barges in Victoria Harbour in the evening of October 1. The firework, which costs HK$13 million, lasted for 23 minutes. It is the most expensive firework since the city's handover in 1997. Despite the shower, people were seen flocking in until the very beginning of the ceremony at 8pm. Police estimated the number of attendees to 250,000 in Kowloon and 26,000 on the island. Crowd control measures were in place with the closure of numerous roads. The Marine Department issued special notices restricting maritime traffic and urged vessel owners to follow safety guidelines. Dozens of people gathered in Central in memory of the 39 people killed in the collision of two tourist ships bounding for celebration's firework in 2012. The worst maritime disaster in Hong Kong's modern history has prompted the authorities to issue specific guidelines on boats during fireworks. Some families have been demanding justice as the proceedings are ongoing. The flow of people took some time to disperse. Roads were cleared at around 10p.m.   Reported by Raphael Blet Edited by Cecilia Wong

Alleged drug found at venue of Road to Ultra Music Festival

  • 2017-09-18
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Erin Chan、Michael ShumEdited by: Angela Cheung、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-18

  One man died, two other men and a woman still hospitalised at Queen Elizabeth Hospital after collapsing at Hong Kong's Road to Ultra Electronic Music festival held last Saturday. Police found alleged drug during the investigation today at the Nursery Park in West Kowloon Culture District. Police said they found a small amount of substance- including one red and part of a light blue pill at the scene. However, they added that autopsy will be conducted later to confirm cause of death of the man. In response to the accident, West Kowloon Cultural District authority said they would discuss on how they can improve security checkups and relevant monitoring procedures at similar, large-scale events in the future.   The authority stated that the four people had suffered from heatstroke. Some attendees were dissatisfied with the insufficient of water supply at the venue. The temperature was 32 degree Celsius on Saturday, while Hong Kong Observatory has raised ‘Very hot weather warning' to remind citizens the greater risk of heatstroke. Road to Ultra is an one-day electronic music festival held at Nursery Park, West Central Kowloon District last Saturday. According to the host, there were around 8,000 attendees on the event. Attendees had their bags checked at the security control of the festival. The organiser has set 15 house rules including strict prohibition of drugs. Spokesperson for Road to Ultra also added that there were around 100 security guards at the site to monitor the flow of the audience. There were three first aid booths to provide medical assistance. Four participants, aged between 21 and 29 collapsed at Hong Kong's Road to Ultra Electronic Music festival held last Saturday. They were all sent to Queen Elizabeth Hospital after the staff at the venue were alerted. One of the men, 27-year-old surnamed …

Groups call for prompt legal actions on pro-independence students

  • 2017-09-13
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Erin Chan、Michael ShumEdited by: Tracy Zhang、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-13

A number of anti-independence groups urged the Police Force to take legal actions on activists who put up banners calling for independence of the city on university campuses days before on Tuesday morning. Gathering outside Hong Kong Police Headquarters, one of the pro-Beijing groups reiterated that "discussion of Hong Kong Independence is a sheer violation of the basic law". Anti-independence group Protect Hong Kong member Mrs. Lam, one of the protesters on the scene, said that she hopes law enforcement would "pursue legal action" against pro-independence activists on campuses. "July 1, 1997 is the indication that Hong Kong has fully returned to China ever since. The pro-independence messages posted on campuses are simply sugarcoated poison that distort the values of [university] students," she said. Solicitor Chong Yiu-kwong said it is a hot potato to judge whether putting pro-independence posters on university campuses is illegal. "In the context of Hong Kong's legal system, generally speaking, criminal liability will arise only when you have committed something the law mentioned specifically as illegal. So [In my opinion], it is highly unlikely that simply posting a poster with pro-independence message will cause the subversion of a country [China]," he said. "Even if the expressions made by university students on pro-independence can be justified in the current law of Hong Kong, the Beijing government might interpret "freedom of speech" differently," said Chong. Chinese University student union leader Au Tse-ho, described the action of putting up pro-independence banners on university campuses as a "healthy practice". "According to my knowledge, these actions happening in universities are all liable and are conducted in a rational way that is not hurting anyone," Au said. Former convenor of Civil Human Rights Front Eric Lai Yan-ho said universities should allow a high level of freedom of expression. Reported by Alexander Lin,  Erin Chan …