#hongkong

Culture & Leisure

Hip-hop geeks leap forward with local rap battles

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Daisy Lee、Jianne SorianoEdited by: Daisy Lee、Jianne Soriano
  • 2017-10-26

At eleven o'clock on Saturday night, when it's past bedtime for the city, the nightlife hub in Hong Kong's Lan Kwai Fong just kicked off its day. Standing at the entrance of an underground club, Hector "SCF-SAiNT" Telmo, in a plain black t-shirt with the words "Straight Outta Home Kong" was busily distributing leaflets for his hip-hop show held later night. Unlike others, he's looking for the chance to break the deadlock of hip-hop on the 'cultural desert' by organising regular rap battles in Central hipster clubs. Straight Outta Home Kong is a underground music project co-founded by two non-Chinese rappers, Telmo and Mohit "DJ Mojito" Kailandasani. Telmo has been stuck for a while in developing his career as a rapper. "Nobody opened the doors for us, nobody gave us opportunities. We felt like outcasts, so our mission was 'how do we bridge the gap, how do we connect, how we get to work with them,'" he said. Though the road to success is not as simple as he expected, the 25-year-old didn't stop. Instead, he started searching for way-out for his fellows—to connect Cantonese, English and Tagalog rappers, who were also looking for a place in the hip-hop industry for a long time. "Now that there's a platform, an opportunity and the fact that the younger generation can see this...at least they have something to look up to, especially on the ethnic minority side," he added. Invited by Telmo, Eric "Heartgrey" So, a Hong Kong beatboxer who debuted about 10 years ago, sees hip-hop battles held in bars as a chance 'to show [their] passion and energy to the local people'. "It's already hard to do music in Hong Kong so if there's a platform...why don't you perform and participate?" Describing the times when he was still starting as …

Health & Environment

Two out of 40 prepackaged juices found to contain mycotoxin

  Consumer Council said two of prepackaged juices samples were tested positive for patulin, a mycotoxin a UN committee on Food Additives say could suppress immunoreactions, damage nerves and affect the development of infants. Although patulin is commonly present in decaying fruits, especially apples, “the risk is higher in juices because mould cannot be seen”, said council spokesman Michael Hui King-man. The distributors have instantly removed the two cold pressed apple and blended apple juices, in which the amount of patulin have exceeded the Centre for Food Safety's action level. The council also found that the dietary fibre content of all 40 samples, including those with fruit pulps claims, was lower than the detection limit of less than 1.1g/100ml of fruit juice. Vitamin C content in apple juices was also found generally lower than 2mg/100ml, whilst that in orange juices, on the whole, was higher, ranging from 11 to 52mg/100ml. High sugar content in all samples also entailed that they are “not deemed as a low-sugar food” under Hong Kong’s current nutrition labelling standards. For the sample with the most sugar, drinking 1 bottle of 360ml of juice would amount to 46g of sugar intake. In other words, it is equivalent to 92% of an adult average daily intake of 50g free sugars limit. The council urged consumers not to substitute fruit juice for fruit because juices contain less vitamin C and fibre but are more expensive. Reported by Holly Chik Edited by Daisy Lee

National day firework draws hundreds of thousands

  • 2017-10-02

As part of the 68th National Day celebrations, 31,888 pyrotechnic shells were fired from five barges in Victoria Harbour in the evening of October 1. The firework, which costs HK$13 million, lasted for 23 minutes. It is the most expensive firework since the city's handover in 1997. Despite the shower, people were seen flocking in until the very beginning of the ceremony at 8pm. Police estimated the number of attendees to 250,000 in Kowloon and 26,000 on the island. Crowd control measures were in place with the closure of numerous roads. The Marine Department issued special notices restricting maritime traffic and urged vessel owners to follow safety guidelines. Dozens of people gathered in Central in memory of the 39 people killed in the collision of two tourist ships bounding for celebration's firework in 2012. The worst maritime disaster in Hong Kong's modern history has prompted the authorities to issue specific guidelines on boats during fireworks. Some families have been demanding justice as the proceedings are ongoing. The flow of people took some time to disperse. Roads were cleared at around 10p.m.   Reported by Raphael Blet Edited by Cecilia Wong

Society & Politics

After Three Years, Sea of Yellow Umbrellas re-appeared in Admiralty

  • The Young Reporter
  • By: CHAN Yeuk Hang Erin、Michael Shum、Daisy LeeEdited by: Isabella Lo
  • 2017-09-28

Convener of Citizen Charter 617 James Hon Lin-shan, also an organiser of the event, said more than a thousand people attended the commemorative rally of Umbrella Movement on Thursday - a double of what he expected. At 5.58pm, participants stood for three minutes of silence with their yellow umbrellas raised.  Steam and sound were used to re-enact the scene at the exact time three years ago, when police started intimidating tear gases to force out the protesters. Around 40 parties and civil groups set up booths in the anniversary event. The three Occupy Central founders -  Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Chan Kin-man and Reverend Chu Yiu-ming were among the speakers on stage. Tai said that people in Hong Kong should keep the faith in fighting for democracy. “No matter how the situation becomes, we should believe that Hong Kong can enjoy true democracy one day, “ he said. The associate professor of law at the University of Hong Kong also criticized the government’s suppression on discussions over Hong Kong independence. “Tell me why speaking about Hong Kong independence has violated the law? Which law I have actually violated?” Tai added. He also pointed out that the trio are all mentally prepared for the possible imprisonment. 'I believed once we have started the road of civil disobedience, we have to pluck up our courage to walk till the end, including being imprisoned,'' Reverend Chu said. The pro-democracy Umbrella Movement took place in 2014 was aimed to fight for universal suffrage to elect the city’s leader and to resist the 831 framework proposed by Beijing. The 831 framework, laid down by the National People's Congress Standing Committee, set limits for 2017 Chief Executive Elections and 2016 Legislative Council in HKSAR, which involves screening of candidates and emphasizes the importance of a patriotic leader. …

60 anti-Japanese groups commemorate 86th anniversary of Mukden Incident

  • 2017-09-18
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Michael Shum、CHAN Yeuk Hang ErinEdited by: Tracy Zhang、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-18

60 anti-Japanese groups showed up in Central on Monday to commemorate the 86th anniversary of  Mukden Incident which marks Japan's invasion in China. Organised by Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions, groups including Association of Chiang Kai-shek - gathered outside the Exchange Square in response to Japan's development in military power. Social committee member of the Hong Kong Federation of Trade Unions, Kan Ming-tung urged Japan to face the history regarding the invasion of China on September 18, 1931. Kan said he felt regret that they were not allowed to enter the Consulate-General of Japan in Hong Kong and no representative from the office had accepted their letter.      

Alleged drug found at venue of Road to Ultra Music Festival

  • 2017-09-18
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: CHAN Yeuk Hang Erin、Michael ShumEdited by: Angela Cheung、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-18

  One man died, two other men and a woman still hospitalised at Queen Elizabeth Hospital after collapsing at Hong Kong’s Road to Ultra Electronic Music festival held last Saturday. Police found alleged drug during the investigation today at the Nursery Park in West Kowloon Culture District. Police said they found a small amount of substance- including one red and part of a light blue pill at the scene. However, they added that autopsy will be conducted later to confirm cause of death of the man. In response to the accident, West Kowloon Cultural District authority said they would discuss on how they can improve security checkups and relevant monitoring procedures at similar, large-scale events in the future.   The authority stated that the four people had suffered from heatstroke. Some attendees were dissatisfied with the insufficient of water supply at the venue. The temperature was 32 degree Celsius on Saturday, while Hong Kong Observatory has raised ‘Very hot weather warning’ to remind citizens the greater risk of heatstroke. Road to Ultra is an one-day electronic music festival held at Nursery Park, West Central Kowloon District last Saturday. According to the host, there were around 8,000 attendees on the event. Attendees had their bags checked at the security control of the festival. The organiser has set 15 house rules including strict prohibition of drugs. Spokesperson for Road to Ultra also added that there were around 100 security guards at the site to monitor the flow of the audience. There were three first aid booths to provide medical assistance. Four participants, aged between 21 and 29 collapsed at Hong Kong’s Road to Ultra Electronic Music festival held last Saturday. They were all sent to Queen Elizabeth Hospital after the staff at the venue were alerted. One of the men, 27-year-old surnamed …

A huge obstacle to Hong Kong recycling industry

  • 2017-09-14
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: Elisa Luk、Erica Chin、Li Wing Kiu、Li Suet WaEdited by: Celia Lai、Richelia Yeung、Tiffany Lui
  • 2017-09-14

  Hong Kong recycling operations can no longer export local scrap paper to the mainland due to a national ban on importing foreign solid waste. Issued in July, the policy notice stated that China will no longer import 24 types of waste including unsorted scrap paper and waste plastic by the end of this year. Despite being a special administration region, Hong Kong cannot export any waste paper to the mainland for recycling. A local recycling shop operator, Ng Siu-po, said the price of paper has already dropped by half due to the release of the policy. Ng said the price level of waste paper is now $500 per metric ton, which was a thousand per metric ton, and expected the price to drop further after it is put into practice. The profit his business gained has dropped a third. He is pessimistic towards the recycling industry in Hong Kong. “Selling waste paper is the main source of income of my business. If the mainland stops importing waste paper, there is no other places for us to sell the waste paper and I may need to close down my recycling shop,” Ng said. Wendell Chan, the project officer of Friends of the Earth, added that China is the biggest importer of Hong Kong’s recyclable waste, which constitutes about 98%. Chan predicted the recyclable will be sent to the landfills instead without the normal exit channels.          Ms Au, who collects waste paper for a living, said that her income has fallen by half due to lowered price of scrap paper. She added that her monthly income was about $3000 to $4000 in the past but now her income is only about $2000. “I hope that the Hong Kong Recycle Materials & Re-Production Business General Association Limited can bargain with the …

Groups call for prompt legal actions on pro-independence students

  • 2017-09-13
  • The Young Reporter
  • By: CHAN Yeuk Hang Erin、Michael ShumEdited by: Tracy Zhang、Daisy Lee
  • 2017-09-13

A number of anti-independence groups urged the Police Force to take legal actions on activists who put up banners calling for independence of the city on university campuses days before on Tuesday morning. Gathering outside Hong Kong Police Headquarters, one of the pro-Beijing groups reiterated that “discussion of Hong Kong Independence is a sheer violation of the basic law”. Anti-independence group Protect Hong Kong member Mrs. Lam, one of the protesters on the scene, said that she hopes law enforcement would “pursue legal action” against pro-independence activists on campuses. “July 1, 1997 is the indication that Hong Kong has fully returned to China ever since. The pro-independence messages posted on campuses are simply sugarcoated poison that distort the values of [university] students,” she said. Solicitor Chong Yiu-kwong said it is a hot potato to judge whether putting pro-independence posters on university campuses is illegal. “In the context of Hong Kong’s legal system, generally speaking, criminal liability will arise only when you have committed something the law mentioned specifically as illegal. So [In my opinion], it is highly unlikely that simply posting a poster with pro-independence message will cause the subversion of a country [China],” he said. “Even if the expressions made by university students on pro-independence can be justified in the current law of Hong Kong, the Beijing government might interpret “freedom of speech” differently,” said Chong. Chinese University student union leader Au Tse-ho, described the action of putting up pro-independence banners on university campuses as a “healthy practice”. “According to my knowledge, these actions happening in universities are all liable and are conducted in a rational way that is not hurting anyone,” Au said. Former convenor of Civil Human Rights Front Eric Lai Yan-ho said universities should allow a high level of freedom of expression. Reported by Alexander Lin,  Erin Chan …

Culture & Leisure

Different Faces, Same Values

Located in Tsim Sha Tsui, Chungking Mansions is not only a landmark but also a hub of different cultures with many ethnic minorities. Walking out from Tsim Sha Tsui station, Muhammed Hussain is used to the hustle and bustle of the crowd. Many have East Asian faces, speaking Mandarin or Korean loudly with a draw- bar box in hand. Many of these tourists with money to burn love the emporiums where they can easily find popular designer brands such as Louis Vuitton or Gucci. It’s 12:03pm. Hussain looks down at his watch as he waits for the traffic light to cross busy Nathan Road. In a few hours, white-collar workers and tourists will head to the nearby historic Peninsula Hotel for afternoon tea. But neither the Peninsula nor the emporium is Hussain’s destination. Instead, he steps through an inconspicuous building entrance and heads upstairs to his mobile phone shop. Everyday Hussain, a 20 year-old Pakistani man, follows the same routine. He meets 20 to 30 customers a day until he closes his shop at 9 pm. He may go for a late lunch, usually curry and rice, not because he likes it but because it is a common menu in the building. Just like other commercial buildings in the neighborhood, there are many mobile phone shops, money changers and restaurants. But unlike other buildings, restaurants here mainly sell Indian food and most shopkeepers are South Asian and African men. The building’s name is Chungking Mansions, and it’s history is full of mystery and lore to even locals and the tourists who know it for its cheap accommodation. Located in Tsim Sha Tsui, one of the most prosperous districts in Hong Kong, Chungking Mansions has never been seen as a part of Hong Kong, even after being chosen as a landmark …